Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Signs & Symptoms of Oral Cancer

Below are some of the signs and symptoms you could experience when oral cancer develops. If you have any of these signs or symptoms, please call us immediately!


Early detection SAVES LIVES! 







Self-Exam for Oral Cancer

You've heard us say that knowledge is power, and when it comes to oral cancer, knowing how to perform a self-exam can save your life.

Here are the simple steps of an oral cancer self-exam:




Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Early Detection Saves Lives!


With regular, semi-annual cleanings our hygienists and Dr. Clark will perform oral cancer screenings, free of charge. That is how important it is to them! In fact, Dr. Clark has been the first one to diagnosis several conditions that our patients had no idea they were experiencing.

Give yourself the peace of mind by scheduling these important appointments and by knowing you are being proactive in your healthcare.

We are here to answer any questions or concerns you may have. Please don't hesitate to contact us if you have any issues that could potentially harm you.










Wednesday, April 5, 2017

Are You At Risk For Oral Cancer?


Oral cancers are becoming far more prevalent than in times past. Our living and eating habits have increased the likelihood that you or someone you know will be diagnosed with oral cancer in their lifetime.

In the United States alone over 50,000 cases of oral cancer are diagnosed every year. The sad truth is that many more lives can be saved with early detection. Far too often people ignore their oral health care, which can be a fatal decision.

The greatest thing you can do for yourself and your loved ones is to stay up on your semi-annual dental exams and cleanings. Dr. Clark and our hygienists are experts in oral cancer detection. If you ever have sores, swelling, or unexplained tenderness in your mouth, please schedule an appointment immediately. It could be the difference between life and death for you!


Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Smart Snacking Tips for Kids



March is National Nutrition Month. We have been providing simple suggestions of how to incorporate healthy food choices into your diet. How have you been doing?

We know you're not perfect. As a matter of fact, we've all been guilty of making poor snack choices. Imagine this: it's 5 p.m. and your rushing out the door to a child's sporting event before you can serve dinner to your family. You grab something quick to tie yourself or your child over. Was it a good choice? Snacking can be our nemesis if we are not careful.

EatRight.org offers 20 quick snack choices that are also healthy. Feel free to follow the link in order to read their full list. Here are our top five favorite ideas:

  1. Toast a whole grain waffle and top with low-fat yogurt and sliced fruit or smooth nut butter.
  2. Frozen Treats: Mix equal amounts of fat-free plain or flavored yogurt with 100% fruit juice, then pour into paper cups and freeze for a tasty treat
  3. Quesadilla: Sprinkle shredded cheese over a corn or whole wheat tortilla; fold in half and microwave for twenty seconds. Top with salsa.
  4. Rocky Road: Smear low-fat chocolate pudding on a whole grain graham cracker, then top with a marshmallow.
  5. Make your own fruit roll-up by pureeing fruit and either baking it in the oven or by using a dehydrator.

Another great idea is to meet together as a family to prepare quick snacks. By dividing up fruit and veggies into snack size bags, and having bins in the fridge available for a quick grab, your family and conquer the snacking nemesis together!




Source: http://www.eatright.org/~/media/eatright%20files/nationalnutritionmonth/handoutsandtipsheets/nutritiontipsheets/smartsnackingtips4kids_nnm2017.ashx

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Whole Grains Make a Mouth Happy!



March is National Nutrition month. Each week we have been sharing simple tips to help you make smart food choices, which leads to a healthier you. Adding whole grains is one simple thing that you can add to your family's diet, and the dividends will be delicious and beneficial.

EatRight.org shares the following tip on adding whole grains to your diet;

How to Find Whole Grains

Remember, being brown doesn't make bread whole wheat and being white may not mean that bread is made with just refined white flour. Finding whole-grain breads takes some label reading skills. Any bread labeled "whole wheat" must be made with 100-percent whole-wheat flour.
Also, did you know that even if bread labels advertise "seven-grain" or "multigrain," they are not necessarily whole-grain products? Check the Nutrition Facts panel to make sure whole-wheat flour is listed as the first ingredient and find loaves made mostly with whole-wheat or other whole-grain flour.

Add Whole Grains to Your Meals

Want to add more whole grains to your meals? Change your cooking style to include more whole grains and boost the fiber content of meals. Partner whole grains — brown rice and vegetable stir-fry or a whole-wheat pita stuffed with salad. Fortify mixed dishes with high-fiber ingredients — try adding bran or oatmeal to meat loaf.
Looking for other ways to make half your family's grains whole?
  • Start with breakfast. Choose a fiber-rich, whole-grain breakfast cereal, oatmeal or toast. Check the grams of fiber per serving; more fiber will keep you feeling fuller, longer.
  • Choose whole grains over refined items when selecting breads, buns, bagels, tortillas, pastas and other grains.
  • Experiment with different grains such as buckwheat, bulgur, millet, quinoa, sorghum, whole rye or barley. To save time, cook extra bulgur or barley and freeze half to heat and serve later as a quick side dish.
  • Enjoy whole grains as a snack. Three cups of whole-grain, air-popped popcorn contains 3.5 grams of fiber and only 95 calories. Also, try 100-percent whole-wheat or rye crackers.

Join us in the challenge of making better food choices this month. A few good choices really add up in the overall picture. A healthy mouth begins with healthy food intake. We know you can do it!

Call today to schedule your
semi-annual cleaning!
541-451-1440


http://www.eatright.org/resource/food/nutrition/dietary-guidelines-and-myplate/choose-whole-grains

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Tame the Sugar Monster!



Looks can be deceiving! Unfortunately today, sugar takes many different forms in the food we purchase. We can no longer trust labels to tell us in lay man's terms the ingredients our foods contain. We must educate ourselves so we can make the best decisions for ourselves and our loved ones.

EatRight.org shares that a high intake of sugar is linked to cavities, obesity, Type 2 diabetes and other health conditions. 

The 2015 Dietary Guidelines recommends Americans limit added sugars to no more than 10 percent of their daily calorie needs. That's about 12 teaspoons (48 grams of sugar) on a 2,000-calorie diet. But for kids — especially little kids, who may only need 1,200 to 1,400 calories per day — it's even less.

Common Sources of Added Sugars

Some sources of added sugars are easy to spot, such as:
  • Sugary beverages (soda, fruit punch, sweet coffee and energy drinks)
  • Sugary cereal
  • Candy and chocolates
  • Flavored yogurt
  • Baked goods such as cakes, pastries and cookies
However, added sugars can hide in some surprising places, including:
  • Whole-grain cereals and granola
  • Instant oatmeal
  • Frozen foods
  • Granola bars, protein bars and cereal bars
  • Pasta sauce
  • Dried fruit, canned fruit, applesauce and fruit juices
  • Baby food
  • Barbecue sauce, ketchup, salad dressing and other condiments

Tips for Avoiding Added Sugars

The first step in reducing your family's added sugar intake takes place in the grocery store. Scan labels for added sweeteners and, instead, fill your shopping cart with healthier options. Sally Kuzemchak, MS, RD, a blogger and mother of two, recommends reaching for naturally sweet foods. Her favorites? "Fruit! Lots of veggies are naturally sweet too, especially bell peppers, carrots and sugar snap peas," she says.
When it comes to beverages, Kuzemchak recommends water and milk. "Many other beverages have ingredients kids don't need, like caffeine, added sugar and artificial dyes or sweeteners," says Kuzemchak.
You can also reduce added sugar intake at home by cooking from scratch. By making your own granola, pasta sauce and condiments and serving homemade baked treats, you are in control of the ingredients used. "With baking recipes, I frequently cut the sugar with no negative effect to the recipe or to how much my family likes it," Kuzemchak says. "I usually start by cutting it by a quarter and go lower if possible."
One common source of added sugar is flavored yogurt. You can start reducing added sugar intake from yogurt by mixing half a serving of flavored yogurt with half a serving of plain, unsweetened yogurt. This trick works with cereal too. As your family's taste buds adjust, gradually use less and less of the sweetened varieties.
Make a healthy relationship with food the overall focus instead of a completely sugar-free diet. Encourage positive associations with foods such as fruits and vegetables by playing up their good qualities and fresh taste — and save the sweet stuff for special occasions.
 Call today to schedule your
semi-annual cleaning! 

Keep those teeth clean!
541-451-1440
Source: http://www.eatright.org/resource/food/nutrition/dietary-guidelines-and-myplate/looking-to-reduce-your-familys-added-sugar-intake-heres-how