Wednesday, August 3, 2016

Flossing is All the Buzz!

Source: http://myteethforever.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/tim-loughran-dentistry-floss.jpg
Media outlets around the country, including the New York Times, ran an article yesterday touting that flossing may no longer be necessary. 

The article cites "all flossing may be overrated." The buzz comes from the quiet removal of the instruction to floss daily in the latest dietary guidelines published by the Department of Agriculture and Health and Human Services. This decision came about because the control groups used to show the effectiveness of flossing were not large enough to prove its necessity in preventing oral health problems.

While health professionals agree the control groups should have been larger, and larger studies need to take place, the American Dental Association (ADA) published its own article yesterday stating that "Interdental cleaning is proven to help remove debris between teeth that can contribute to plaque buildup."

The people who consistently choose not to floss may find some justification for their choice with this recent news story, but the reality is those who have developed good oral hygiene habits will continue to floss because the results are visible and tangible, and dentists across the country will continue to tell their patients that flossing is a critical component to their oral health care needs. 

Think of it this way. Every day we take out the trash in our homes, and weekly the city comes to collect that garbage. If food is left behind in a trash can, and it is exposed to the elements, it will begin to rot and smell horrible. The same is true with plaque. If you are not regularly "taking out the trash" or removing debris from hard to reach spots in your mouth, that plaque (which contains 500 species of bacteria by the way) will rot and smell much the same way inside your mouth.

Source: http://www.esteticaa.co.uk/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/estetica-plaque.jpg
The bottom line is keeping your mouth clear of debris through brushing and flossing or using a water flosser, along with regular dental cleanings will result in a happier, healthy mouth. Gingivitis will not set in as quickly, which leads to serious gum disease, and further health problems.

The choice, of course, is yours, but as for our office - we will keep on flossing!

Call us if you have any questions or concerns about this important topic - 
541-451-1440.


Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Pot Use and Gum Disease

A long-term study of approximately 1,000 New Zealanders from birth to the age of 38 has found that people who have smoked marijuana for up to 20 years have more gum disease.

Dr. Clark’s Message: “Please notice the age range of the study was birth to 38 years (the prime of life). We all know that many health problems increase in severity and frequency as the population ages. While this research does not link marijuana to other health problems, there are many studies that link gum disease and the infections and inflammation of gum disease to serious health problems such as heart disease, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis to name a few. To coin a phrase, we might think of gum disease as a "gateway illness."

The article also quotes Madeline Meier, an assistant professor of psychology at Arizona State University and one of the authors of the study, “We don’t want people to think, ‘Hey, marijuana can’t hurt me,’ because other studies on this same sample of New Zealanders have shown that marijuana use is associated with increased risk of psychotic illness, IQ decline, and downward socioeconomic mobility,.”

This study is ongoing and I will be interested to see the results as time goes by.



 Stay safe this summer!

541-451-1440

Wednesday, July 20, 2016

The Clock is Ticking...Back to School is Coming!


We don't want to be the bearer of bad news...but back to school time is just around the corner. Please remember that Oregon law now requires all incoming kindergarten students to have a dental exam. 

Our appointments are filling up rapidly, and we don't want you to be rushed when school starts.


Call us today!
541-451-1440

Listen to one of our great patients about her positive experience with our dental office and team.


Wednesday, July 13, 2016

Special Offer - Don't Miss Out!



Great Savings Just For You!
Our Customized Bleach Trays are on sale!
Only $197! 
These make great gift ideas too!


WHITENING YOUR TEETH

1. Follow Dr. Clark's instructions on how to load gel into your custom bleaching tray. Use no more than 1/3 to 1/2 of the syringe. Too much gel may cause sensitivity.

2. Brush teeth before inserting tray.

3. Lightly tap tray to adapt tray sides to teeth.

4. Wear Opalescence 35% for 30 minutes to one hour.

5. Do not swallow gel or rinsed gel. Product contains peroxide and may contain fluoride; swallowing large amounts can be harmful.

6. Clean tray with soft brush and cool tap water. Store tray in case provided.

Some old alagum or "silver" fillings may leave a dark purple color in your bleaching tray; this is normal.

Crowns, bridges, partial dentures, veneers, and composite fillings will not bleach. 

Store bleach out of the sun and heat. Refrigeration recommended. Do not freeze. 


Call to Order Yours Today!
541-451-1440

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Tooth Fairy Magic



Colgate.com has some fun ideas of how to celebrate the dental milestones your children and grandchildren experience as they grow. 

Losing a tooth, especially that first tooth, is a big milestone in a child's life, so try commemorating the moment with some crafts for the first lost tooth. Ideas such as a memory page with the theme of the first lost tooth work nicely. If you're not the crafting type, don't worry. A simple idea, such as decorating a photo of your child without his tooth, is easy and fun.
Decorating a photo means your child doesn't have to worry about missing out on the tooth fairy's reward and you get a treasured memento of that first lost tooth. Let your little one enjoy decorating the paper around the photo of his missing tooth. Then, either frame the decorated photo or stick it in your scrapbook.
What You Need to Get Started
  • Have your little one give you the biggest, toothy smile possible and snap a picture. Alternatively, get a picture of the tooth in your child's hand or on a small display pillow beside a dime or other small object, for scale.
  • Upload the picture to your computer and print it out in the center of a sheet of standard paper.
  • Grab some colorful markers, glue and iridescent glitter.
  • Write your child's name, age and the date the tooth came out below the picture so everything is ready when you give the craft supplies to your little one.
Decorating the Picture
Get ready to turn your little one's creativity loose.
  1. Give your child some ideas of things to write or draw, such as a motivational saying about the lost tooth, pictures of loose teeth, a colorful toothbrush, a tube of toothpaste or anything tooth-related he feels like drawing.
  2. Make thin glue swirls all the way around the picture's border and then sprinkle the shimmery glitter in the glue.
  3. Allow the glue to dry completely before displaying the keepsake photo.

Call if you have any questions regarding your child's loose teeth.
(541) 451-1440.

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Soft Drinks = Disaster


Children are consuming ever-greater amounts of soft drinks that could increase their risk for obesity and dental disease, according to the American Dental Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics. The health organizations are recommending that parents urge children to consume nutritious drinks in school and at home.
Children age 6 to 19 consume significantly more ounces of soft drinks each day than milk or juice. Teenage boys and girls are drinking twice as much soft drink as milk and one-third of teenage boys drink at least three cans a day. Consumption of milk, the principle source of calcium in the typical American diet, decreases as soft drinks become a favorite choice for children.
"Sweetened drinks are the primary source of added sugar in the daily diet of children," said Renee Jenkins, M.D., AAP vice president. "Each 12-ounce serving of a carbonated, sweetened soft drink contains the equivalent of 10 teaspoons of sugar. Not only should parents be discouraging their children from drinking soda, but they can set a good example by choosing to drink healthier alternatives themselves."
Dentists have long recognized that good nutrition has a direct link to good oral health, according to Dr. Kimberly Harms, an ADA consumer advisor.
"When teeth come in frequent contact with sweetened soft drinks and other sugar-containing substances, the risk of tooth decay, which is the most common childhood disease, is increased as is the potential for erosion of tooth enamel," Dr. Harms explains. "Kids and teens are more susceptible to decay from soft drinks because their tooth enamel is not fully developed."
School vending machines and some vendor contractual arrangements influence youth consumption patterns and increase soft drink access, say the ADA and AAP. The organizations oppose such arrangements that target children and promote over consumption of soft drinks.
Pediatricians and dentists recommend children choose beverages that hydrate and contribute to good nutrition, such as fruit juice with no sweeteners, low-fat and non-fat white or flavored milk, vegetable juice and water.
In promoting good health, parents are also encouraged to make dental exams a regular part of the back-to-school routine, including completion of all health examinations and necessary immunizations in time for the new school year.
Please contact the ADA if you have questions about this article.
© 2016 American Dental Association. All rights reserved. Reproduction or republication is strictly prohibited without the prior written permission from the American Dental Association.
http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/life-stages/childrens-oral-care/article/ada-08-kids-dental-health?thumbparam=childrens-oral-care/483817227

Wednesday, June 8, 2016

The Snack Attack!

Do you fall victim to the snack attack? Is all snacking unhealthy?

Colgate.com shares some great information about the dangers and benefits that can come from proper snacking choices. With summer in full swing, the more you operate offensively, and carefully plan the snacks available to your family throughout the day, the better off everyone will be with their overall health.

Snacking and tooth decay
If fluoride is our greatest protection against decay, then frequent snacking can be our teeth's biggest enemy. Every day, you and your family face snacking challenges. Here's what you need to know:
It's how often you snack that matters
The truth is that what your family eats isn't as important as when and how often they snack! It all has to do with the "plaque reaction," and this is how it works:
The plaque reaction
Everyone has plaque bacteria in their mouths. But when these plaque bacteria meet up with the sugars and starches that are found in snacks such as cookies, candies, dried fruits, soft drinks or even pretzels or potato chips, the plaque reacts to create acid, and a "plaque attack" occurs.
The fact is most snacks that you eat contain either sugars or starches that give plaque this opportunity to make acid. And each "plaque attack" can last for up to 20 minutes after you have finished your snack. During this period, the plaque acid is attacking tooth enamel, making it weak. That's when cavities can start!
Fighting back against plaque
The good news is, you can take a stand against plaque! By brushing twice daily with a fluoride toothpaste and by reducing the number of times you snack each day, you and your family can help prevent tooth decay.
When it comes to snacking, it's best to choose something nutritious and to snack in moderation. It's also better to eat the whole snack at one time! Here's why: eating five pieces of a snack at one time exposes your teeth to possible tooth decay — for approximately 20 minutes. Nibbling on those same five pieces at five different times exposes your teeth to possible tooth decay for approximately 100 minutes. What a difference!
You need to watch baby's sweets, too! Infants are just as susceptible to decay as older children and adults. In fact, Early Childhood Cavities can be a very serious condition. See The Preventing Early Childhood Cavities section below for more information.
Source: http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/basics/brushing-and-flossing/article/family-guide-to-oral-health